L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Aggiornamenti e discussioni sugli ultimi lavori in campo scientifico.

Moderatore: Staff moderatori

Rispondi
Avatar utente
Fox_Mulder
Amministratore
Messaggi: 1321
Iscritto il: lun lug 03, 2006 1:28 pm
Autenticazione: 132435465768
Località: Oslo, Norvegia.
Contatta:

L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Fox_Mulder » lun gen 30, 2012 11:22 pm

E' noto che i medici americani ce l'hanno con l'olio di oliva, in particolare se l'obiettivo è perdere peso.
Ma riguardo la salute? Un articolo dal blog legato a Fuhrman: http://www.diseaseproof.com/archives/hu ... -rest.html lo devo ancora leggere, lo copio al volo.
"We can't tell people to stop eating all meat and all dairy products," he said. "Well, we could tell people to become, vegetarians," he added. "If we were truly basing this only on science, we would, but it is a bit extreme."
(Director, of Harvard's Cardiovascular Epidemiology Program)

Marzian
Amministratore
Messaggi: 619
Iscritto il: lun nov 15, 2010 9:03 pm
Autenticazione: safhfjhasfjasfsajk
Località: Venezia
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Marzian » mar gen 31, 2012 12:14 am

Qualche rassegna degli ultimi anni sull'olio di oliva, che pare Fuhrman non abbia letto...
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Oct;51(10):1279-92.
Molecular mechanisms of the effects of olive oil and other dietary lipids on cancer.
Escrich E, Moral R, Grau L, Costa I, Solanas M.
Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Medical Physiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Eduard.Escrich@uab.es

Cancer is one of the main causes of mortality worldwide. Geographical differences in incidence rates suggest a key effect of environmental factors, especially diet, in its aetiology. Epidemiologic and experimental studies have found a role of dietary lipids in cancer, particularly breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers. Their incidence in the Mediterranean countries, where the main source of fat is olive oil, is lower than in other areas of the world. Human studies about the effects of dietary lipids are little conclusive, probably due to methodological issues. On the other hand, experimental data have clearly demonstrated that the influence of dietary fats on cancer depends on the quantity and the type of lipids. Whereas a high intake of n-6 PUFA and saturated fat has tumor-enhancing effects, n-3 PUFA, conjugated linoleic acid and gamma-linolenic acid have inhibitory effects. Data regarding MUFA have not always been conclusive, but high olive oil diets seem to have protective effects. Such effects can be due to oleic acid, the main MUFA in olive oil, and to certain minor compounds such as squalene and phenolic compounds. This work aims to review the current knowledge about the relationship between dietary lipids and cancer, with a special emphasis on olive oil, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects: modifications on the carcinogenesis stages, hormonal status, cell membrane structure and function, signal transduction pathways, gene expression, and immune system.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17879998
World J Gastroenterol. 2009 Apr 21;15(15):1809-15.
Olive oil consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Assy N, Nassar F, Nasser G, Grosovski M.
Liver Unit, Ziv Medical Centre, Safed, Israel. assy.n@ziv.health.gov.il

The clinical implications of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) derive from their potential to progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis. Inappropriate dietary fat intake, excessive intake of soft drinks, insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress results in increased free fatty acid delivery to the liver and increased hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation. An olive oil-rich diet decreases accumulation of TGs in the liver, improves postprandial TGs, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 responses in insulin-resistant subjects, and upregulates glucose transporter-2 expression in the liver. The principal mechanisms include: decreased nuclear factor-kappaB activation, decreased low-density lipoprotein oxidation, and improved insulin resistance by reduced production of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6) and improvement of jun N-terminal kinase-mediated phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1. The beneficial effect of the Mediterranean diet is derived from monounsaturated fatty acids, mainly from olive oil. In this review, we describe the dietary sources of the monounsaturated fatty acids, the composition of olive oil, dietary fats and their relationship to insulin resistance and postprandial lipid and glucose responses in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, clinical and experimental studies that assess the relationship between olive oil and NAFLD, and the mechanism by which olive oil ameliorates fatty liver, and we discuss future perspectives.

http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v15/i15/1809.htm
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2009 Dec;54(6):477-82.
Olive oil and cardiovascular health.
Covas MI, Konstantinidou V, Fitó M.
Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica (IMIM), CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Barcelona, Spain. mcovas@imim.es

The Mediterranean diet, in which olive oil is the primary source of fat, is associated with a low mortality for cardiovascular disease. Data concerning olive oil consumption and primary end points for cardiovascular disease are scarce. However, a large body of knowledge exists providing evidence of the benefits of olive oil consumption on secondary end points for the disease. Besides the classical benefits on the lipid profile provided by olive oil consumption compared with that of saturated fat, a broad spectrum of benefits on cardiovascular risk factors is now emerging associated with olive oil consumption. We review the state of the art concerning the knowledge of the most important biological and clinical effects related to olive oil and its minor components. The recent advances in human nutrigenomics associated with olive oil consumption will also be assessed. The wide range of benefits associated with olive oil consumption could contribute to explaining the low rate of cardiovascular mortality found in southern European-Mediterranean countries, in comparison with other westernized countries, despite a high prevalence of coronary heart disease risk factors.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19858733
Altern Med Rev. 2007 Dec;12(4):331-42.
Active components and clinical applications of olive oil.
Waterman E, Lockwood B.
Leeds General Hospital, Leeds, UK.

The olive tree, Olea europaea, is native to the Mediterranean basin and parts of Asia Minor. The fruit and compression-extracted oil have a wide range of therapeutic and culinary applications. Olive oil also constitutes a major component of the "Mediterranean diet." The chief active components of olive oil include oleic acid, phenolic constituents, and squalene. The main phenolics include hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, and oleuropein, which occur in highest levels in virgin olive oil and have demonstrated antioxidant activity. Antioxidants are believed to be responsible for a number of olive oil's biological activities. Oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, has shown activity in cancer prevention, while squalene has also been identified as having anticancer effects. Olive oil consumption has benefit for colon and breast cancer prevention. The oil has been widely studied for its effects on coronary heart disease (CHD), specifically for its ability to reduce blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Antimicrobial activity of hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, and oleuropein has been demonstrated against several strains of bacteria implicated in intestinal and respiratory infections. Although the majority of research has been conducted on the oil, consumption of whole olives might also confer health benefits.

http://www.altmedrev.com/publications/12/4/331.pdf
Nutr Hosp. 2010 Jan-Feb;25(1):1-8.
Olive oil, immune system and infection.
[Article in Spanish]
Puertollano MA, Puertollano E, Alvarez de Cienfuegos G, de Pablo Martínez MA.
Universidad de Jaén, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Area de Microbiología, Jaén, España.

Polyunsaturated fatty acids contribute to the suppression of immune system functions. For this reason, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been applied in the resolution of inflammatory disorders. Although the inhibition of several immune functions promotes beneficial effects on the human health, this state may lead to a significant reduction of immune protection against infectious microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites). Nevertheless, less attention has been paid to the action of olive oil in immunonutrition. Olive oil, a main constituent of the Mediterranean diet, is capable of modulating several immune functions, but it does not reduce host immune resistance to infectious microorganisms. Based on these criteria, we corroborate that olive oil administration may exert beneficial effects on the human health and especially on immune system, because it contributes to the reduction of typical inflammatory activity observed in patients suffering from autoimmune disorders, but without exacerbating the susceptibility to pathogen agents. The administration of olive oil in lipid emulsions may exert beneficial effects on the health and particularly on the immune system of immunocompromised patients. Therefore, this fact acquires a crucial importance in clinical nutrition. This review contributes to clarify the interaction between the administration of diets containing olive oil and immune system, as well as to determine the effect promoted by this essential component of Mediterranean diet in the immunomodulation against an infectious agent.

http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?scri ... en&nrm=iso
Carlo Martini.

Disclaimer: Ogni messaggio esprime solo opinioni strettamente personali, non necessariamente condivise da altre persone del Forum "Informazione Alimentare" o di qualunque altra realtà passata, presente o futura a cui posso aver collaborato a qualunque titolo.

Marzian
Amministratore
Messaggi: 619
Iscritto il: lun nov 15, 2010 9:03 pm
Autenticazione: safhfjhasfjasfsajk
Località: Venezia
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Marzian » mer feb 01, 2012 5:17 pm

E per quanto riguarda il dimagrimento, attualmente mi risulta solo questo studio pilota, dove l'olio di oliva ha permesso una maggiore perdita di peso che una dieta con meno grassi totali: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20545561
Carlo Martini.

Disclaimer: Ogni messaggio esprime solo opinioni strettamente personali, non necessariamente condivise da altre persone del Forum "Informazione Alimentare" o di qualunque altra realtà passata, presente o futura a cui posso aver collaborato a qualunque titolo.

Avatar utente
Fox_Mulder
Amministratore
Messaggi: 1321
Iscritto il: lun lug 03, 2006 1:28 pm
Autenticazione: 132435465768
Località: Oslo, Norvegia.
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Fox_Mulder » sab feb 02, 2013 12:28 pm

Questo video che invita ad abolire gli oli. Non conosco bene Kaplan e non so che tipo di medico sia, riconosce brevemente alcuni benefici dell'olio ma per lui non bastano ad abilitarlo.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGGQxJLuVjg

Secondo me alcune cose sono condivisibili:
- il problema con l'olio e' che e' troppo facile usarne troppo (idem sale e zucchero).
- e' eccessivamente denso in calorie
e due elemenhti creano problemi soprattutto a chi deve perdere peso.

Per quanto riguarda invece soggetti normopeso che non tendono ad ingrassare, possiamo ignorare per un attimo il discorso calorie e guardare solo agli aspetti salutistici. Lui parla di effetti negativi di un eccesso di grassi (olio incluso) nel sangue, e dice che il fatto che la dieta mediterranea sia sana non e' per merito dell'olio di oliva, ma nonostante l'olio! E' sana perche' in pratica e' una dieta vegetariana.
"We can't tell people to stop eating all meat and all dairy products," he said. "Well, we could tell people to become, vegetarians," he added. "If we were truly basing this only on science, we would, but it is a bit extreme."
(Director, of Harvard's Cardiovascular Epidemiology Program)

Marzian
Amministratore
Messaggi: 619
Iscritto il: lun nov 15, 2010 9:03 pm
Autenticazione: safhfjhasfjasfsajk
Località: Venezia
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Marzian » sab feb 02, 2013 5:52 pm

E' un medico vegan di cui avevo già letto qualcosa. Ho guardato velocemente il video: credo sia un bravo oratore, che intercala bene racconti personali e immagini ad effetto... Però mi sembra che, in questo caso, a favore della sua tesi abbia sono un paio di pubblicazioni datate e decontestualizzate, ignorando la pressochè totalità della ricerca in quest'ambito.

Anzitutto, l'apporto netto di calorie da solo non può predire gli effetti sul peso corporeo, in quanto nell'equazione manca la variabile degli effetti metabolici di un cibo, nonchè quelli sulla sazietà, che contribusce all'aderenza a lungo-termine ad un piano dietetico, visto che il problema fondamentale è mantenere il peso perso per gli anni successivi. Rispetto al dimagrimento, avevo scritto degli appunti sul ruolo dei grassi in generale (e dei monoinsaturi in particolare) qui: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1011. In breve, l'idea che i grassi ed in particolare i grassi monoinsaturi (in un range calorico sotto il 40 %) contribuiscano a far ingrassare è priva di riscontri. Non a caso, per l'olio di oliva:
http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10 ... .2009.1759
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16711599
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19707219

La questione della funzionalità endoteliale post-prandiale (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 9700008962) è piuttosto complessa, come si può leggere nella discussione qui: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 9706019127. Ma il punto chiave sono gli effetti endoteliali/cardiovascolari a lungo termine, non quelli successivi ad un pranzo, ed anche se sicuramente serve altra ricerca, ad oggi non ci sono state sorprese negative, anzi:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22914255
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 9706011223
http://www.maturitas.org/article/S0378- ... 0/abstract
http://journals.lww.com/cardiovascularp ... e=abstract
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/96/1/142.abstract
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/di ... id=8783684

Poi c'è la salute extra-cardiovascolare, con le rassegne che avevo citato più sopra (e aggiungo anche questa, sul trattamento delle IBD: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413052). Anche qui non emerge nessuna controversia sostanziale. In particolare, di fronte ad una pubblicazione come la seguente (vedi grafico) sul ruolo dell'olio di oliva nella prevenzione tumorale, includendo anche i Paesi non-mediterranei, perdonami ma sinceramente continuerò a bermerlo quotidianamente senza nessun pensiero :D : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3199852/

Immagine
Carlo Martini.

Disclaimer: Ogni messaggio esprime solo opinioni strettamente personali, non necessariamente condivise da altre persone del Forum "Informazione Alimentare" o di qualunque altra realtà passata, presente o futura a cui posso aver collaborato a qualunque titolo.

mammafelice
Staff
Messaggi: 248
Iscritto il: gio giu 19, 2008 5:58 pm
Località: provincia di torino
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da mammafelice » gio feb 07, 2013 10:50 am

Io mi sono fatta l'idea, del tutto personale, che il vero "problema" con gli olii è che sono un alimento "innaturalmente concentrato". Mi spiego: premesso che accetto gli aspetti anche positivi sulla salute dell'olio di oliva, credo che siano merito dei polifenoli delle olive e del fatto che i grassi moninsaturi sono i più stabili e quindi meno infiammanti (non ho letto tutti gli abstract e non ho più accesso purtroppo agli articoli completi, ma sarebbe interessante valutare studi in cui l'olio è sostituito con olive non salate, per dire e non con altri olii o zuccheri come spesso accade).
Insomma, credo che l'olio di oliva non faccia male e sia un ottimo alimento per i normopeso e tutti i soggetti che beneficiano da grassi extra (bambini per esempio).
Credo che il solo problema per i soggetti sovrappeso è, come dice Fox, la facilità con cui si può esagerare senza accorgersene. Per chi di voi ha mai provato a misurare i due cucchiaini consigliati da vegpyramid, cucinando, avrà visto che chiunque faccia un soffritto mettendo l'olio "a naso" (tralasciando il fatto che sarebbe meglio usarlo sempre a crudo oltretutto), senza accorgersene di cucchiai ne mette 4 per volta (e con la densità calorica dell'olio non è uno scherzo da poco). Non posso che pensare che i benefici dell'olio di oliva (potere saziante dei grassi, benefici dei monoinsaturi, polifenoli vari) sarebbero ancora maggiori se la giusta quantità di grassi della dieta (che di certo non credo siano da demonizzare) provenisse da alimenti vegetali grassi, ma integri, che apportano ANCHE fibre, minerali e vitamine.
Secondo voi?
http://www.naturalmentemangiando.it/
Socia SSNV e SINVE, Biologa.

seitanterzo
Staff moderatori
Messaggi: 2428
Iscritto il: dom ago 06, 2006 2:16 pm
Autenticazione: a9a9a9a9a9a9
Località: Roma

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da seitanterzo » gio feb 07, 2013 6:03 pm

mammafelice ha scritto: Secondo voi?
Quoto tutto!
L'olio è da considerare un supplemento nutrizionale e per questo motivo non vale la regola "se 1 è salutare, 10 lo è il 1000% in più".

Parlando di un prodotto concentrato (le olive verdi hanno il 15% di grassi, quelle nere il 25%, l'olio il 99,9%) va usato per "integrare" la dieta e il sapore dei piatti, ma non deve in alcun modo far parte del 30-50% delle calorie giornaliere come invece molte persone usano fare, soprattutto il quei paesi dove ungere qualsiasi cosa con dosi abbondanti di olio fa parte della tradizione culinaria.

Se parliamo di dimagrimento, non sarebbe nemmeno così necessario avere un'attenzione mirata al grammo, dato che le modificazioni della cottura possono ritenersi più decisive nei confronti degli accumuli adiposi rispetto agli alimenti originali, naturalmente con riferimento a una dieta equilibrata.
Educatore Alimentare

Avatar utente
Fox_Mulder
Amministratore
Messaggi: 1321
Iscritto il: lun lug 03, 2006 1:28 pm
Autenticazione: 132435465768
Località: Oslo, Norvegia.
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Fox_Mulder » mer feb 27, 2013 5:49 pm

Nuovo articolo di McDougall, evidenzia le lacune di un recente studio pubblicato sulla dieta mediterranea. Mi sembra che le sue critiche nel merito di questo articolo siano molto valide.


Riguardo l'olio, concordo con voi, i miei dubbi nei confronti dell'olio non sono tanto motivati da una eventuale nocività (come sottolinea Marzian le evidenze non sostengon oquesta tesi), ma principalmente per:
- difficoltà nel dosare e la quasi-certezza di usarne troppo. Per questo, in un discorso di salute pubblica generale, avrei timore a consigliarne un uso regolare, invitando semplicemente ad "usarne poco". E' davvero difficile regolarsi.
- eccessiva concentrazione, come spiegato da mammafelice. E ricordiamo che è pur sempre un alimento artificiale. Non c'e' dubbio che sia preferibile consumare le olive!
- infine, ma forse il principale motivo, ho seri dubbi che l'olio di oliva e altri oli COTTI non siano dannosi in qualche modo. Gli studi mi pare che si basino semplicemente sul consumo di olio, senza specificare se cotto o crudo. Cosa sappiamo sulla cottura? Sarebbe interessante approfondire questo punto.

Io per ora, se dovessi rivolgermi al pubblico, mi terrei su questa posizione: non utilizzare oli cotti, cucinare senza grassi (tranne quando necessario alla riuscita della ricetta), e aggiungere olio a crudo per motivi aromatici, cercando di stare molto attenti alle dosi.[/]

Io personalmente consumo olio di oliva tutti i giorni, anche perchè già cosi faccio fatica ad ingrassare e mangio come un elefante, figuriamoci diminuendo i grassi! :D Però cerco di non utilizzarlo nella cottura, e solo a crudo nei piatti dove ha un senso aggiungerlo (insalata di pomodoro, zuppa, etc).

seitanterzo ha scritto:..... come invece molte persone usano fare, soprattutto il quei paesi dove ungere qualsiasi cosa con dosi abbondanti di olio fa parte della tradizione culinaria.


Ovvero la mia adorata nonnina :D pioggia di olio! Pero' poi piano piano ha imparato a cucinare "meno saporito" :D

Se parliamo di dimagrimento, non sarebbe nemmeno così necessario avere un'attenzione mirata al grammo, dato che le modificazioni della cottura possono ritenersi più decisive nei confronti degli accumuli adiposi rispetto agli alimenti originali, naturalmente con riferimento a una dieta equilibrata.


Gian me la spieghi meglio questa? Non ho capito XD
"We can't tell people to stop eating all meat and all dairy products," he said. "Well, we could tell people to become, vegetarians," he added. "If we were truly basing this only on science, we would, but it is a bit extreme."
(Director, of Harvard's Cardiovascular Epidemiology Program)

seitanterzo
Staff moderatori
Messaggi: 2428
Iscritto il: dom ago 06, 2006 2:16 pm
Autenticazione: a9a9a9a9a9a9
Località: Roma

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da seitanterzo » mer feb 27, 2013 8:04 pm

Fox_Mulder ha scritto: Gli studi mi pare che si basino semplicemente sul consumo di olio, senza specificare se cotto o crudo. Cosa sappiamo sulla cottura? Sarebbe interessante approfondire questo punto.
La cottura degli oli influenza la loro stabilità producendo acreolina, molecola tossica e cancerogena. Per questo viene consigliato l'olio extra vergine d'oliva anche per la frittura, in quanto ricco di monoinsaturi e a più alto punto di fumo rispetto agli altri oli. La cosa che si può maggiormente consigliare, come dicevi tu, è un consumo moderato di olio a crudo, ma non è necessaria un'attenzione millimetrica nel versarlo sui cibi.
Fox_Mulder ha scritto:
Se parliamo di dimagrimento, non sarebbe nemmeno così necessario avere un'attenzione mirata al grammo, dato che le modificazioni della cottura possono ritenersi più decisive nei confronti degli accumuli adiposi rispetto agli alimenti originali, naturalmente con riferimento a una dieta equilibrata.
Gian me la spieghi meglio questa? Non ho capito XD
Rileggendo la mia frase, credo che mi si fossero incrociati i bottoni della tastiera! :lol:
Volevo dire che la cottura produce alterazioni metaboliche che si ripercuotono sui processi digestivi, causando maggiori accumuli adiposi. Il cibo cotto e "vivo" può contare su enzimi propri ed essere tramutato più facilmente in energia e sostanze plastiche, evitando una digestione laboriosa e sgradevole, senza dover necessariamente diventare tutti crudisti (cosa che però non sarebbe male). Siamo in un'era in cui non viene più enfatizzata l'importanza del numero di calorie nella dieta, ma l'attenzione è ora rivolta alla composizione del cibo nella sua struttura naturale.
Educatore Alimentare

Avatar utente
Fox_Mulder
Amministratore
Messaggi: 1321
Iscritto il: lun lug 03, 2006 1:28 pm
Autenticazione: 132435465768
Località: Oslo, Norvegia.
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Fox_Mulder » mar lug 01, 2014 4:28 pm

Ragazzi riporto su questa interessante discussione, perch\e vedo che non ci siamo ancora, e oltreoceano medici che noi consideriamo punti fermi e di riferimento, continuano ad inserire l'olio tra gli alimenti da eliminare al pari di carne e altro.

Ora, sicuramente eccessivo, ma sentite Caldwell Esselstyn (!): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_o4YBQPKtQ che va urlando "No oil!".
La sua argomentazione:
- studi positivi sugli effetti dell'olio, ma dice che è sbagliato, se guardi a studi di lungo termine: due gruppi, uno su grassi saturi e uno su grassi monosaturi, angiogramma a fine anno e le malattie cronariche sono peggiorate uguale nei due gruppi.
- poi cita uno studio sulle scimmie e sui roditori, ma li ignorerei e mi meraviglio che si basi su studi del genere.
- olio di oliva ha stesso effetto del burro quando si tratta di attivare l'effetto che restringe le arterie (non sono sicuro a cosa si riferisca in inglese).
- altri due studi che mostra come l'olio di oliva pregiudica la dilatazione "flow-mediated" delle arterie.
- olio di oliva come fattore di rischio nel tumore al seno

Mah!

Poi c'è McDougall, lo sapevamo già: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OF7Uanr-lYA
Dice che gli oli non sono un cibo, che estrarre l'olio lascia dietro tutto il resto, e che sono tossici e promuovo obesit\a, cancro, malattie cardiovascolari.
L'errore è quindi seguire una dieta sana e non eliminare l'olio.

MA c'è Dr. Greger che come sempre mi sembra il più equilibrato, pur consigliando chiaramente i cibi integrali e non gli oli.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glmZA0x3Ltc

Da notare che dice che quando ha chiesto ad altri medici di produrre evidenze a supporto delle loro tesi contro i grassi, non hanno segnalato nessun studio valido eccetto ad esempio quello sulle scimmie africane (citato da Esselstyn!).

http://nutritionfacts.org/video/extra-v ... l-vs-nuts/
Qui illustra uno studio in cui si compara l'effetto di olio extra vergine, noci e mandorle. Chiaramente noci e mandorle vincono, ma l'olio non fa male, e anzi ha buoni effetti. Conclude dicendo che l'olio è un po come un succo di frutta, troppe calorie per il nutrimento che fornisce, e dunque come tale va trattato.

Ho visto che parla anche di una parte dell'olio che viene tolta, ma mi chiedo: esistono oli in commercio che mantengono parte della polpa?
"We can't tell people to stop eating all meat and all dairy products," he said. "Well, we could tell people to become, vegetarians," he added. "If we were truly basing this only on science, we would, but it is a bit extreme."
(Director, of Harvard's Cardiovascular Epidemiology Program)

mammafelice
Staff
Messaggi: 248
Iscritto il: gio giu 19, 2008 5:58 pm
Località: provincia di torino
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da mammafelice » mar lug 01, 2014 9:14 pm

I tuoi dubbi sono i miei :-)
Di una cosa però mi sono convinta, che si tratta comunque di "raffinati" privati di quasi tutti i nutrienti. Senza arrivare a eliminare tutti gli alimenti grassi, credo che l'ideale sia comunque ottenerli direttamente da noci e semi piuttosto che da olii.
Qualcuno di voi ha sperimentato?
Io sinceramente cucino ormai senza olio da un pezzo, però non ho mai eliminato del tutto appunto noci o avocado ecc.
http://www.naturalmentemangiando.it/
Socia SSNV e SINVE, Biologa.

Forrest
Messaggi: 734
Iscritto il: mar ott 20, 2009 9:37 pm
Autenticazione: 123456789101112

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Forrest » ven lug 04, 2014 11:08 pm

Queste teorie mi lasciano un pò perplesso: allora non dovremmo più farci i centrifugati di verdure perchè le fibre sono state tolte??
E' fondamentale attingere nella giornata a tutti i nutrienti, fibre comprese ma questo non pregiudica il fatto che posso consumare comunque grassi puri o succhi puri separati dalle fibre.

mario
Messaggi: 20
Iscritto il: lun mar 17, 2014 1:23 pm
Autenticazione: 123456789abcdef

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da mario » sab lug 05, 2014 5:03 pm

ogni commento è superfluo

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NE ... cleMethods

Participants in the two Mediterranean-diet groups received either extra-virgin olive oil (approximately 1 liter per week) or 30 g of mixed nuts per day (15 g of walnuts, 7.5 g of hazelnuts, and 7.5 g of almonds)

In conclusion, in this primary prevention trial, we observed that an energy-unrestricted Mediterranean diet, supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts, resulted in a substantial reduction in the risk of major cardiovascular events among high-risk persons. The results support the benefits of the Mediterranean diet for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Marzian
Amministratore
Messaggi: 619
Iscritto il: lun nov 15, 2010 9:03 pm
Autenticazione: safhfjhasfjasfsajk
Località: Venezia
Contatta:

Re: L'Olio di Oliva: mito?

Messaggio da Marzian » sab lug 05, 2014 6:21 pm

Riguardo alle opinioni di questi medici, e lo studio PREDIMED giustamente citato da mario, avevamo discusso un po' qui: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2722

Comunque, dopo tutto questo parlare, direi che siamo al punto di partenza: c'è un consenso scientifico totale che vede l'olio di oliva, in particolare (ma non solo) extra-vergine, come un cibo salutare e liberamente raccomandabile. Per altro, i dati del PREDIMED sono stati aggiornati lo scorso mese, e nuovamente:
Olive oil consumption, specifically the extra-virgin variety, is associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and mortality in individuals at high cardiovascular risk.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4030221/).
E per quanto riguarda il tumore al seno, dall'EPIC:
There was no association between olive oil and risk of estrogen or progesterone receptor-positive tumors, but a suggestion of a negative association with estrogens and progesterone receptor-negative tumors.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 6/abstract
Infatti, guardando alla densità mammaria:
Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models, adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), energy intake and protein consumption as well as other confounders, showed an association between greater calorie intake and greater MD [odds ratio (OR) = 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.38, for every increase of 500 cal/day], yet high consumption of olive oil was nevertheless found to reduce the prevalence of high MD (OR = 0.86;95% CI = 0.76-0.96, for every increase of 22 g/day in olive oil consumption)
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 3/abstract
Poi, c'è una piccola minoranza di medici (anziani, ossia formatisi professionalmente in anni con concezioni sul ruolo de grassi nella salute umana completamente diverse da quelle odierne, e proni a citare articoli vivisezionisti) che la pensa diversamente, ma che non ha nessuna pubblicazione a proprio favore: nè studi (nemmeno sul presunto e mai dimostrato ruolo dell'olio nel favorire l'aumento di peso a partire dalla sua densità calorica), o - ed è questa la cosa più sorprendente -neppure propri commenti personali che siano stati pubblicati come risposta su qualche rivista.

Se mai un giorno ci saranno queste pubblicazioni, allora potremo riparlarne partendo da qualcosa di più concreto...
Carlo Martini.

Disclaimer: Ogni messaggio esprime solo opinioni strettamente personali, non necessariamente condivise da altre persone del Forum "Informazione Alimentare" o di qualunque altra realtà passata, presente o futura a cui posso aver collaborato a qualunque titolo.

Rispondi